Tilde's release party: A recap

Tilde, which was conceived in September 2017, is a new venture of Thirty West. Sporting poetry, prose, and visual arts on a global scale, the themeless first issue received over 500 submissions, containing exponentially more individual pieces. We had no idea what to expect, and read wonderful content enough for an entire year. It was a bittersweet journey, but it is done. Let us tell you how it all ended...


March 23rd, 2018

 Tilde: A Literary Journal: Issue 1 spread

Tilde: A Literary Journal: Issue 1 spread

For the month of March, the Tilde team worked fastidiously to assemble the journal. There were some expected, and unexpected, hold-ups, many rounds of proofing, and bouncebacks from potential venues to host us. Aspirations were dwindling until we got a fulfilling email from a local venue.

Nestled in the heart of the Manayunk neighborhood of Philadelphia, on Cotton Street, The Spiral Bookcase, with its periwinkle brick facade, opened their doors for the release of Tilde. Their intimate setting was inviting for all the attendants, with rows of books to casually peruse through. Occasionally, Amelia, the calico cat, would meow and hop on the lap on an attendee. On top of that, they had friendly and accommodating staff who ensured a perfect event. The dozens arrived, indulged in hors d'oeuvres, and stood patiently for the first word.

 Editor-in-chief, Josh Dale, kicks off with the editor's note. (Right) Fiction editor, Nick McMenamin.

Editor-in-chief, Josh Dale, kicks off with the editor's note. (Right) Fiction editor, Nick McMenamin.

Josh began the reading with the editor's note, based off of sea turtles. The patrons, raising their copies akin to hymnals, read along or stared attentively. It was only the beginning of a memorable night with five Tilde contributors that are local to the Philadelphia area.

 Heath Brougher reading his intense poems in Tilde.

Heath Brougher reading his intense poems in Tilde.

Our first reader was Heath Brougher based out of York, PA. His work is cerebral and hypercritical to society. He also read from his other collections, which made all of us ponder.

 Randall Brown, sifting through many short fiction pieces.

Randall Brown, sifting through many short fiction pieces.

Up next was Randall Brown. He is part of Rosemont College's MFA faculty and a masterful short story and flash fiction writer. His pieces were visually appealing, humorous, and vivacious for life. The occasional chuckle would rise and fall with every beat of his reading.

 Morgan Smith reading her short story, Don't Speak Ill of the Dead.

Morgan Smith reading her short story, Don't Speak Ill of the Dead.

Arguably the youngest contributor of Tilde, Morgan Smith, a Bryn Mawr college freshman, captivated the audience with a harrowing tale of domestic proportions. Much applause was saved for the end and aspirations of a budding career.

 Sunny Reed recounting memories of writing her Tilde memoir, The Lucky Ones.

Sunny Reed recounting memories of writing her Tilde memoir, The Lucky Ones.

Hailing from Southern NJ, Sunny Reed was next to take the 'corner'. She was elated to read her first publication with us, part of an autoethnography as an Asian adoptee. A heart-warming account of motherhood soothed us all, bringing some to tears. 

 Oscar Vargas closing out the night with serenading poetry.

Oscar Vargas closing out the night with serenading poetry.

Our final feature of the night was Oscar Vargas, an MFA student from Brooklyn College. He joked about the bus ride down here before flooring us with a bilingual poetry reading of Spanish & English. His inflections were a light breeze in spring.

The night concluded with good banter, acknowledgments, newfound friendships, and a promising outlook of a new international journal. The lights may have been turned off and the door locked, but Tilde's inaugural debut will remain with us forever.

Acknowledgments

Thank you, firstly, to our editors, Nick McMenamin, Bob Kaplan, Tara Tomaino, Carrie Soltner, and Alex Breth for making this journal come to fruition with your dedication. Also, thank you to the scores of readers for helping us sift through the madness. Lastly, to every contributor, you had faith in us when we were nothing. Now, we want to share a collective success with you in any way we can. 

Want to read Tilde?

A free PDF can be found here. Print editions are available at the 30W Shop and ship internationally.